Comments

  1. humble furniture maker
    June 26, 2007 at 4:46pm
    Please! Enough with this day of silence. Just play music.
    Reply
  2. c_philpott2001
    June 26, 2007 at 5:06pm
    I've got a bad feeling that this fight is lost. If it's going to take Congressional action to save the industry, then Internet radio is dead. The Music industry has very good lobbyists, and they are now armed with a decision from a "fair and impartial" judiciary body. The uncomfortable truth for the Music Industry is that they are no longer needed. Music creation, promotion, and distribution can be done completely outside of thier business processes. What I recently came to realize is that Internet Radio poses a potentially more significant threat beyond any caused by copyright infringement. What would happen if Pandora merged with splicemusic.com and began attracting some talent?
    Reply
  3. Al
    June 26, 2007 at 5:35pm
    I called all three of my Reps for the state of Florida. All of their mailboxes are currently full. Hopefull they are overwhelmed by free internet radio callers. Pandora is great. I hope we prevail.
    Reply
  4. Alex
    June 26, 2007 at 7:17pm
    I'm not proud of it, but i have to say i never care about political stuff nor do i even care to vote....but since Pandora is down its time i take a roll in government. Today for the first time in my life i hand wrote my congressman "Dennis Hastert" I really hope he takes this seriously because I'm going insane today. Imagine a lifetime without Pandora!!
    Reply
  5. Frank
    June 26, 2007 at 7:48pm
    All I have to say is that all the CDs I have on my rack were bought because Pandora helped me find good music that I like in every sense which I want to hear in my car and my Mp3 player. If sites like this go away, how the am I going to know what to buy anymore?
    Reply
  6. David
    June 26, 2007 at 8:32pm
    You can still listen to music here, just open a google cache version of Pandora.com Of course, the real front page will probably be up in 30 minutes
    Reply
  7. Gareth
    June 26, 2007 at 9:45pm
    I really hope we can keep services like Pandora. They help find new, interesting artists and as a result are generating money. I cannot see the ethics behind upping the fees.
    Reply
  8. Eran Nachum
    June 27, 2007 at 12:08am
    I must tell, that yesterday in the 'Internet Radio - Day of Silence' I felt like cripple, something was missing to me all day at work... Keep on going on and do your best to keep it alive... Eran.
    Reply
  9. Roland
    June 30, 2007 at 9:33am
    Dear Roland : Thank you for contacting me regarding H.R. 2060, the Internet Radio Equality Act. I appreciate hearing from you. Like you, I feel strongly that webcasters sh ould be able to reach as many listeners as possible. This is why I have signed on as cosponsor of H.R. 2060, the Internet Radio Equality Act. As you know, this legislation rectifies the recent Copyright Royalty Board (CRB) decision to establish royalty pay ments to musicians and performing artists based on each performance. Instead, H.R. 2060 would institute rates at .33 cents per hour and listener or 7.5% of yearly webcaster revenues. H.R. 2060 would also set mandates for future CRB decisions, requiring the Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Communications and Information and the Federal Communications Commission to submit respective reports on the effect of proposed decisions on the Internet webcasting market. Additionally, the Corporation for Public Broad casting would be required to submit a report to Congress addressing the effect of future CRB decisions on their licensees and permittees . These studies would work towards balancing the needs of webcasters , performers, and internet listeners, in order to en sure the survival of a vital resource for musicians and fans alike. As you know, this is not the first time this issue has been before Congress. In the 107th Congress, I cosponsored The Internet Radio Fairness Act (H.R. 5285) and voted for the Small Web caster Amendments Act of 2002 (H.R. 5469). The Small Webcaster Amendments Act of 2002 was signed into law on December 4, 2002. It amended the Copyright Royalty Board's 2002 rate increase establishing the rate system that exists today. I have consistently s upported radio webcasting on the internet in the past and continue to do so with my current cosponsorship of H.R. 2060. Again, thank you for contacting me. If I can be of further assistance, please do not hesitate to contact me again regarding this or ot her issues of concern. Sincerely, Rick Larsen United States Representative Washington State, 2nd District
    Reply
  10. Earl
    July 12, 2007 at 10:32am
    Internet broadcasters like Pandora have done more for the music industry that the folks at the RIAA will ever admit. Since starting to listen to Pandora I've found many new artists, whose CDs I've purchased, and renewed my interest in lots of those artists that I used to listen to on vinyl, which I'm now replacing with newly purchased CDs. This CRB fiasco is representative of our government and industry at it's worst. Let's all keep pulling for our rights as consumers of music, for which we are willing to pay a fair price!
    Reply

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