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Hello again everyone,
Thanks for all the great responses last week. It’s nice to have such a vibrant, participatory group!
On my desk right now, I have a bunch of books, including “Can’t Stop Won’t Stop” by Jeff Chang, “Sound of the Beast – The Complete Headbanging History of Heavy Metal” by Ian Christe, and “The Latin Beat” by Ed Morales. I have a very large stack of music books both here and at home, and I’m constantly nibbling away at them to find more great music for Pandora.
I thought it would be interesting to ask you folks what your favorite music books are. Do tell!
Meanwhile, to get things started, here are a few of mine:
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Emotion and Meaning in Music by Leonard Meyer
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Words and Music by Paul Morley


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Miles by Miles Davis with Quincy Troupe
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Our Band Could Be Your Life by Michael Azarrad
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Can’t Stop Won’t Stop by Jeff Chang
cheers!
mz

Comments

  1. Cliff C
    January 23, 2007 at 6:17pm
    Well, if you ever dug the Blues Brothers (or still do), I'd recommend the biography Belushi and/or Live from New York (also has a lot about their musical acts)
    Reply
  2. Michael Zapruder
    January 23, 2007 at 11:42pm
    these are all great recommendations - I have read some of them but others are new to me. but not for long! kevin, you're so right on about the zollo songwriters on songwriting boo. I love that one. And I have "this is your brain on music" in my stack at home, bob. I've also read beneath the underdog and agree with you completely about it, lisa. an amazing book. I know we're supposed to be all about the music, but I'm hitting the bookstore this weekend! mz
    Reply
  3. SolSaul
    January 24, 2007 at 12:13pm
    The one book that really changed my life (well, at least music listening habits) was "Last Night A DJ Saved My Life" by Bill Brewster and Frank Broughton. It's the story of 20th century music as seen through the eyes of the DJ. Very well written music history full of emotions and crazy details... Plus, no intellectual beard stroking!
    Reply
  4. Tony
    January 25, 2007 at 12:05pm
    The whole - Thirty Three and a Third Series (33 1/3rd) - small pocket books, each one devoted to the story on the making of a single legendary album, like.... Beastie Boys Paul's Boutique, Beatles' Let It Be, Sly and the Family Stone's There's a Riot Goin' on, Velvet Underground's The Velvet Underground and Nico, etc... Some music fiction for the lovers of jazz and odd stories - The Bear Comes Home by Rafi Zabor crazy story about a talking, beer drinking, musical genius BEAR in new york city that ends of loving jazz and becoming one great be-bop saxaphonist....definitely worth a read for any great lover of john coltrane, ornette coleman, etc.. on the Art tip: Art of Modern Rock: The Poster Explosion great book covering the different movements and visual artists involved in contemporary Concert Poster Art
    Reply
  5. David Barnes
    January 27, 2007 at 2:30pm
    The one book that I've been able to hold on to longer than any other is the very first Rolling Stone Record Review collection. Of course one of the big reasons is the stuff from the 50's and 60's but this is also a reminder of how important those reviews were and how much I connected (or didn't) with the reviewers. I really don't have that connection with any review source anymore and sort of miss it.
    Reply
  6. Jeff Sandifer–
    January 29, 2007 at 12:33pm
    For the Punk + New Wave + Early Indie modern rock, check out any of the Trouser Press compilations. Out-of-print. However, the info is now compiled online: TrouserPress.com
    Reply
  7. Kevin Seal
    January 29, 2007 at 2:48pm
    Tony's dead on about those 33 1/3 books. Great, great pieces of writing there. I just started reading their "Music From Big Pink" novella this weekend (thanks, Scott).
    Reply
  8. Alyssa
    January 31, 2007 at 3:32pm
    Fargo Rock City by Chuck Klosterman. It gave me a whole new appreciation for heavy metal (considering I had none before, that's saying...well, something). I find books that talk about someone's personal connection with music fascinating. Along those same lines, High Fidelity by Nick Hornby makes you want to make some mix tapes.
    Reply
  9. GlobalWarming Awareness2007
    February 01, 2007 at 2:03am
    Very cool.
    Reply
  10. Raymond Babcock
    February 13, 2007 at 1:00pm
    Music to sooth the savage beast.
    Reply

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