Subject: Latest on International Pandora…
Dear Global Pandorans –
It’s been a few (painful) months since we had to begin blocking listeners outside the US. Many of you have been writing in for updates, so we thought it would be useful to post the latest news. Sorry for not having done so sooner. Sadly, our posting that “we are working hard on international licensing” remains the same.
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We have been working intensively on bringing Pandora to the UK first and we were hopeful of doing so. The situation with regards to licensing took a bad turn a couple months ago with the issuance of a publishing rate in the UK which leaves total sound recording royalties and publishing royalties substantially out of whack with the realities of ad-supported webcasting/internet radio economics. So we’re back in the trenches trying to find an answer, working with the recording and publishing industries, that works for everyone. This has been an intense period of education and negotiation and it continues unabated.
As it stands now, there is still no affordable license for a webcaster to stream legally (ie. abiding by all standing copyright law and properly compensating performers and composers) anywhere outside the US, (actually, make that within the US too as we’re trying to work through a whole other mess here as well!) Paul (our Managing Director of Pandora Int’l) is working full time on the international business out of London.
We continue to be cautiously optimistic that a reasonable answer will be reached – largely because it would be so counter-productive for everyone not to do so. But we remain unable to make any solid predictions about timing – history has taught us that’s a fool’s errand.
You can trust that this remains at least as frustrating for us as it is for you.
Keep the faith…
Tim (Founder)

Comments

  1. varinder singh
    February 28, 2010 at 6:55am
    whats your latest visa scheem ?
  2. Ashish
    November 13, 2010 at 10:52am
    Pandora is amazing! You need to start it in countries that do not have licensing issues. Maybe start with Brazil, India and Russia rather than London/Europe. You have a good product and once you enter a few countries the global popularity and awareness will grow forcing the rest to succumb to public pressure.

Comments are closed.